The Native Fishing Association (NFA)
Promotes and Supports Indigenous People
in BC's Commercial Fishing Industry.

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The Native Fishing Association (NFA)

Supporting Indigenous
BC Fishers

The Native Fishing Association (NFA) promotes and supports Indigenous commercial fishers in BC. Whether you have an established commercial fishing business or have just become interested in the industry, we are here to help.

We provide loans and grants, shared licenses and quotas, and a variety of support services to help you grow or start your fishing business.

Please browse our website to learn more about our programs and services, and get in touch if you have any questions.

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#throwbackthursdayinfishing

This time to when reserve lands were allocated to First Nations in BC so that the land could be colonized and settled.Did you know that, of the 1500 reserve land allotments in the province of BC, over half of them have written proof that they were promised EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO THEIR FISHERIES? What happened to that promise?Two well-researched books tell this story from professor Douglas C Harris of the Osgoode School of Law (UBC). ... See MoreSee Less

#throwbackthursdayinfishing
This time to when reserve lands were allocated to First Nations in BC so that the land could be colonized and settled.

Did you know that, of the 1500 reserve land allotments in the province of BC, over half of them have written proof that they were promised EXCLUSIVE ACCESS TO THEIR FISHERIES? What happened to that promise?

Two well-researched books tell this story from professor Douglas C Harris of the Osgoode School of Law (UBC).Image attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

Welcome to Indigenous #WomeninFishingWednesday! Where we feature Indigenous Fisherwomen in their element.

Today, we are featuring Trinity Mack from the Nuxalk Nation. She’s doing hatchery/stock enhancement work. Working toward enhancing the stock in their rivers. Here she is pictured on the Atnarko River holding a giant Broodstock Chinook, in Bella Coola, BC, home of the Nuxalk.Thank you for sharing, Trinity! Keep up the amazing work. Watch for future #IWIFW posts. ✨⚓️ ... See MoreSee Less

Welcome to Indigenous #WomeninFishingWednesday! Where we feature Indigenous Fisherwomen in their element.

Today, we are featuring Trinity Mack from the Nuxalk Nation. She’s doing hatchery/stock enhancement work. Working toward enhancing the stock in their rivers. Here she is pictured on the Atnarko River holding a giant Broodstock Chinook, in Bella Coola, BC, home of the Nuxalk.

Thank you for sharing, Trinity! Keep up the amazing work. Watch for future #IWIFW posts. ✨⚓️

✨UPDATED LOCATIONS✨

Partnering with Ha'oom Fisheries Society, we're reaching out to First Nations women in specific communities.Please come learn about our microloan program and how it can help you start a business in areas like catering, accounting, marketing, fish processing/packaging, and more.Please 'click' one of the links below to RSVP to your specific community's event!Business Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – Gold RiverFebruary 20, 2024 at 5:30pmfb.me/e/137tKyPvzBusiness Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – Port AlberniFebruary 21, 2024 at 5:30pmfb.me/e/50WIOkFyN Business Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – TofinoFebruary 22, 2024 @ 5:30pmfb.me/e/1aqveDEFz We look forward to connecting with you all! 🙂Ha'oom Fisheries SocietyMarsha Maquinna ... See MoreSee Less

✨UPDATED LOCATIONS✨

Partnering with Haoom Fisheries Society, were reaching out to First Nations women in specific communities.

Please come learn about our microloan program and how it can help you start a business in areas like catering, accounting, marketing, fish processing/packaging, and more.

Please click one of the links below to RSVP to your specific communitys event!

Business Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – Gold River
February 20, 2024 at 5:30pm
https://fb.me/e/137tKyPvz

Business Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – Port Alberni
February 21, 2024 at 5:30pm
https://fb.me/e/50WIOkFyN 

Business Brainstorming Session for First Nations Women – Tofino
February 22, 2024 @ 5:30pm
https://fb.me/e/1aqveDEFz 

We look forward to connecting with you all! 🙂
Haoom Fisheries Society
Marsha Maquinna

ƛ̓eeko łuucsma of Mowachaht-Muchalaht! Čitakinʔaała n̓ačuʔał suw̓a. ✨

Thank you Women of Mowachaht-Muchalaht! We are happy to see you. ✨Stop one of three! ✔️ Thank you Marsha for the hospitality. Tsaxana is a beautiful and we enjoyed meeting you all. Thank you Ha'oom Fisheries Society for working with us on this road trip!See you tomorrow night, Indigenous Women of Port Alberni. Please RSVP to the link below:www.facebook.com/share/KPT4Jpo73dbQjbtt/?mibextid=9l3rBWShare/Tag the fisherwomen of the area. 😌⚓️ ... See MoreSee Less

ƛ̓eeko łuucsma of Mowachaht-Muchalaht! Čitakinʔaała n̓ačuʔał suw̓a. ✨

Thank you Women of Mowachaht-Muchalaht! We are happy to see you. ✨

Stop one of three! ✔️ Thank you Marsha for the hospitality. Tsaxana is a beautiful and we enjoyed meeting you all. Thank you Haoom Fisheries Society for working with us on this road trip!

See you tomorrow night, Indigenous Women of Port Alberni. Please RSVP to the link below:
https://www.facebook.com/share/KPT4Jpo73dbQjbtt/?mibextid=9l3rBW

Share/Tag the fisherwomen of the area. 😌⚓️Image attachmentImage attachment+2Image attachment

It is Indigenous #FamiliesinFishingFriday, and we are happy to feature the Mckay family from Kitkatla, BC! See the below from Jane Mckay about their fishing family.

“My husband Anthony Mckay, my Dad Godfrey Mason Sr. (Elder, 71 yrs old) and I (Jane Mckay) have food fished together for many years! We give to our community of Kitkatla BC, most of the time we used 2 small skiffs, and fish all day together. We kept what we knew we'd eat in our winter months and gave out the rest to our community. Some days we'd come back with up to 400 sockeye, for our community on two 16 ft skiffs, for their winter preserving! Some days we'd leave 3 or 4am in the morning, before daylight and come back 11pm 12am at the latest. My dad would share his fishing stories from when he was younger. He would harvest our foods with his parents or grandparents. We would listen to him while we pulled in the net by hand. We would have elders & Community members come up to us excited and with tears of joy, hugging us, expressing their gratitude for sharing our catch each season. We have always fished for everyone that couldn't get out themselves to get it. Young parents were contacting us for advice on how to preserve their fish. It has always been fun doing this with my husband and father. We would learn so much from my dad just sitting there waiting for the fish to hit our nets. We'd listen to his stories about how to fish, how he's happy we share with everyone, his upbringing on these fishing grounds. The pictures with the herring eggs on kelp we call (Gyos) happens in March, we collect kelp around the time herring fish spawn & we put out the Gyos aka kelp and let sit till the spawn stops. We harvested that year in 2023 with my husband who did all the setting up and collecting of kelp. He gets the cork line ready to hang the kelp on in the water & my dad came out as a packer for my husband’s harvest. He filled up the skiff 3 or 4 times with herring eggs. The day after we went to drop the trees, that creates LAXS aka branches & again kept what we would eat ourselves throughout the winter months and gave out to whoever came down to the float with totes to take what they wanted. All these years harvesting with my husband and my dad, I was taught to give and share what we get out of the ocean. Every single food season I went with them. We gave to all members in the community, these photos are just some of our favorites. We are grateful to help when we can, a hug/ smile and thank you from elders or community members is all we need to keep us going!”Thank you for sharing, Jane! Keep up the amazing work for your family and community. Look out for more #IFIFF posts. Share yours with us by emailing mercedes@shoal.ca ... See MoreSee Less

It is Indigenous #FamiliesinFishingFriday, and we are happy to feature the Mckay family from Kitkatla, BC! See the below from Jane Mckay about their fishing family.

“My husband Anthony Mckay, my Dad Godfrey Mason Sr. (Elder, 71 yrs old) and I (Jane Mckay) have food fished together for many years! We give to our community of Kitkatla BC, most of the time we used 2 small skiffs, and fish all day together. We kept what we knew wed eat in our winter months and gave out the rest to our community. Some days wed come back with up to 400 sockeye, for our community on two 16 ft skiffs, for their winter preserving! Some days wed leave 3 or 4am in the morning, before daylight and come back 11pm 12am at the latest. 

My dad would share his fishing stories from when he was younger. He would harvest our foods with his parents or grandparents. We would listen to him while we pulled in the net by hand. We would have elders & Community members come up to us excited and with tears of joy, hugging us, expressing their gratitude for sharing our catch each season. We have always fished for everyone that couldnt get out themselves to get it. Young parents were contacting us for advice on how to preserve their fish. 

It has always been fun doing this with my husband and father. We would learn so much from my dad just sitting there waiting for the fish to hit our nets. Wed listen to his stories about how to fish, how hes happy we share with everyone, his upbringing on these fishing grounds. 

The pictures with the herring eggs on kelp we call (Gyos) happens in March, we collect kelp around the time herring fish spawn & we put out the Gyos aka kelp and let sit till the spawn stops. We harvested that year in 2023 with my husband who did all the setting up and collecting of kelp. He gets the cork line ready to hang the kelp on in the water & my dad came out as a packer for my husband’s harvest. He filled up the skiff 3 or 4 times with herring eggs. The day after we went to drop the trees, that creates LAXS aka branches & again kept what we would eat ourselves throughout the winter months and gave out to whoever came down to the float with totes to take what they wanted. All these years harvesting with my husband and my dad, I was taught to give and share what we get out of the ocean. Every single food season I went with them. We gave to all members in the community, these photos are just some of our favorites. We are grateful to help when we can, a hug/ smile and thank you from elders or community members is all we need to keep us going!”

Thank you for sharing, Jane! Keep up the amazing work for your family and community. Look out for more #IFIFF posts. Share yours with us by emailing mercedes@shoal.caImage attachmentImage attachment+4Image attachment

#throwbackthursdayinfishing

To the contribution of logging over the last 150 years of the “salmon crisis”… In 1875 the Portland Morning Oregonian newspaper wrote about the “almost total extinction of salmon in our waters…”Structures were built on salmon rivers, to regulate the transportation of logs to mills, that stopped rivers and unleashed violent flash floods…Log drives created destructive torrents when loggers released water from behind splash dams to flush logs downstream… Early log dams often blocked salmon entirely and even when ladders started being built they were ramshackled designs that failed to help salmon reach spawning grounds… Even when logs reached lumber mills they could still threaten salmon by emitting natural toxins into stagnant backwaters, smother bottoms and absob oxygen as sawdust.Can an industry like logging be held accountable for damage done to salmon runs over the last 150+ years? ... See MoreSee Less

#throwbackthursdayinfishing 
To the contribution of logging over the last 150 years of the “salmon crisis”… 

In 1875 the Portland Morning Oregonian newspaper wrote about the “almost total extinction of salmon in our waters…”

Structures were built on salmon rivers, to regulate the transportation of logs to mills, that stopped rivers and unleashed violent flash floods…

Log drives created destructive torrents when loggers released water from behind splash dams to flush logs downstream… 

Early log dams often blocked salmon entirely and even when ladders started being built they were ramshackled designs that failed to help salmon reach spawning grounds… 

Even when logs reached lumber mills they could still threaten salmon by emitting natural toxins into stagnant backwaters, smother bottoms and absob oxygen as sawdust.

Can an industry like logging be held accountable for damage done to salmon runs over the last 150+ years?Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment
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