The Native Fishing Association (NFA)
Promotes and Supports Indigenous People
in BC's Commercial Fishing Industry.

The Native Fishing Association (NFA)

Supporting Indigenous
BC Fishers

The Native Fishing Association (NFA) promotes and supports Indigenous commercial fishers in BC. Whether you have an established commercial fishing business or have just become interested in the industry, we are here to help.

We provide loans and grants, shared licenses and quotas, and a variety of support services to help you grow or start your fishing business.

Please browse our website to learn more about our programs and services and get in touch if you have any questions.

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T'ooyaḵsiy̓ n̓iin! Our time this past week in Gitlaxt’aamiks was full of love, respect and great excitement about what lies ahead for fishing and seafood commerce there! ... See MoreSee Less

Tooyaḵsiy̓ n̓iin! Our time this past week in Gitlaxt’aamiks was full of love, respect and great excitement about what lies ahead for fishing and seafood commerce there!Image attachmentImage attachment+Image attachment

#womeninfishingwednesday

Today we celebrate Lou Ga Gwelks and the Raven Ladies from Gitxaala Nation (a Ts'msyen community near Prince Rupert).Sgyidmna̱'a̱ (honoured woman), thank you for sharing these pictures with us. Yagwa g̱a̱'aat wayi! (they are fishing now!) ... See MoreSee Less

#womeninfishingwednesday
Today we celebrate Lou Ga Gwelks and the Raven Ladies from Gitxaala Nation (a Tsmsyen community near Prince Rupert).

Sgyidmna̱a̱ (honoured woman), thank you for sharing these pictures with us. Yagwa g̱a̱aat wayi! (they are fishing now!)Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

The IWE Self Assessment tools are now available on our website!

www.shoal.ca/loans-grants/#indigenous-women ... See MoreSee Less

The IWE Self Assessment tools are now available on our website! 
https://www.shoal.ca/loans-grants/#indigenous-women

It's time for #womeninfishingwednesday!

Today we would like to share these beautiful pictures and story from Jessi Minnabarriet, who lives with her family on the unceded territory in the Secwepemc Nation. " I am a very proud, Indigenous fisherwoman. I am Métis and a member of MNBC region 3, Thompson/Okanagan on my maternal side and I am white on my paternal side. I live with my husband and sons on the unceded territory in the Secwepemc Nation. I love to fish. My love of fishing has grown in my later years as I found it gave me an ability to ground, reflect, enjoy silence, stay still, and has brought me joy. I only find this when I fish. I love the sound of the ice as I walk across, the smell of the cool crisp air as it hits my nose and lungs, and I especially love the excitement and the thrill of anticipating the fish biting my hook. I'm also very proud that I have taught my sons how to fish and now they love to fish. It is a deep bond that we have between us now. Albeit we have become sports fishers, and we catch and release a lot, we spend many hours on the ice auguring around holes and huddling together waiting for the bite. I have gratitude to my mother, and especially my father and brother for teaching me to fish. They taught me to fish, and not only did it give me a pastime that brings me joy and solitude, it provided me with the knowledge and ability to know how to independently harvest sustenance that is so good for us. Fresh fish is such good medicine." ... See MoreSee Less

Its time for  #womeninfishingwednesday! 

Today we would like to share these beautiful pictures and story from Jessi Minnabarriet, who lives with her family on the unceded territory in the Secwepemc Nation. 

 I am a very proud, Indigenous fisherwoman. I am Métis and a member of MNBC region 3, Thompson/Okanagan on my maternal side and I am white on my paternal side. I live with my husband and sons on the unceded territory in the Secwepemc Nation. 
I love to fish. My love of fishing has grown in my later years as I found it gave me an ability to ground, reflect, enjoy silence, stay still, and has brought me joy. I only find this when I fish.
 I love the sound of the ice as I walk across, the smell of the cool crisp air as it hits my nose and lungs, and I especially love the excitement and the thrill of anticipating the fish biting my hook. 
Im also very proud that I have taught my sons how to fish and now they love to fish. It is a deep bond that we have between us now. Albeit we have become sports fishers, and we catch and release a lot, we spend many hours on the ice auguring around holes and huddling together waiting for the bite. 
I have gratitude to my mother, and especially my father and brother  for teaching me to fish. They taught me to fish, and not only did it give me a pastime that brings me joy and solitude,  it provided me with the knowledge and ability to know how to independently harvest sustenance that is so good for us. Fresh fish is such good medicine.

Heads up! Transport Canada is running a concentrated inspection campaign this year on fishing vessels.

Make sure your 1. PFDs are aboard and used, 2. your safety procedure manual is aboard, and 3. your stability booklet is customized for your vessel. ... See MoreSee Less

Heads up! Transport Canada is running a concentrated inspection campaign this year on fishing vessels. 

Make sure your 1. PFDs are aboard and used, 2. your safety procedure manual is aboard, and 3. your stability booklet is customized for your vessel.

Happy #WomenInFishingWednesday check out this fisherwoman from Listuguj, Quebec!

"I’ve been a crab fisherwoman for the last 9 years and I absolutely love it! I also fish salmon in June n ice fishing in the winter" - Dayle CondoThanks for sharing, Dayle!🦀 ... See MoreSee Less

Happy #WomenInFishingWednesday check out this fisherwoman from Listuguj, Quebec!

I’ve been a crab fisherwoman for the last 9 years and I absolutely love it! I also fish salmon in June n ice fishing in the winter - Dayle Condo

Thanks for sharing, Dayle!🦀Image attachmentImage attachment

Today on #womeninfishingwednesday I would like to share the success story of Linda Thomas. ... See MoreSee Less

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3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Auntie Linda Thomas ❤️🥰

Poachers and tax cheats

Something special for #womeninfishingwednesday, we honored to share the story of Tenneisha McKay, a member of the Nisga'a Nation, and how fishing was a part of her healing journey.

" I was 23 when I went out on the boat for the first time as a young adult searching for something bigger than myself, I was able to feel more connected with the fact of "Change". When ever me and my father figure would hang out before he passed away July 08th 2020. He would always talk about his fishing adventures and show me many pictures before he died. Once he asked me if he got his aluminum boat set up to go with him, but I never had that chance unfortunately. The first turn around for my fishing adventure home I got to bring his wife 3 or 5 fresh black cod. I absolutely cherish his wife, and his oldest son too. They are awesome people and its sad that Larry Stava lost his life to the battle of cancer. There is so many fishing related memories, but this one sticks out the most. One day at dinner he asked if I could spend a few minutes to come share it with him. He made Salmon Steaks, I didn't know what I was in for until I showed up he had everything all nice and ready to eat. I sat down and laughed so hard that I said out loud I thought growing up I seen it all except leave it to him he made the Salmon steak waaaay bigger than my hand. He caught it on video and when we watched it we laughed so hard my eyes popped out of my head and he was like no seriously that plate is yours.One more memory Id like to share is that we had a go to favourite spot to sit and watch the Prince Rupert harbour, he would talk for hours about his younger years being a tug boat driver, how he could tell you anything you wanted to know about a tug boat. He had big brains but one of his passions were fishing. With that being said when I got the opportunity to head out myself I didn't hesitate, I left the next day. " ... See MoreSee Less

Something special for #womeninfishingwednesday, we honored to share the story of Tenneisha McKay, a member of the Nisgaa Nation, and how fishing was a part of her healing journey.

 I was 23 when I went out on the boat for the first time as a young adult searching for something bigger than myself, I was able to feel more connected with the fact of Change. When ever me and my father figure would hang out before he passed away July 08th 2020. He would always talk about his fishing adventures and show me many pictures before he died. Once he asked me if he got his aluminum boat set up to go with him, but I never had that chance unfortunately. 
The first turn around for my fishing adventure home I got to bring his wife 3 or 5 fresh black cod. I absolutely cherish his wife, and his oldest son too. They are awesome people and its sad that Larry Stava lost his life to the battle of cancer. There is so many fishing related memories, but this one sticks out the most. One day at dinner he asked if I could spend a few minutes to come share it with him. He made Salmon Steaks, I didnt know what I was in for until I showed up he had everything all nice and ready to eat. I sat down and laughed so hard that I said out loud I thought growing up I seen it all except leave it to him he made the Salmon steak waaaay bigger than my hand. He caught it on video and when we watched it we laughed so hard my eyes popped out of my head and he was like no seriously that plate is yours.
One more memory Id like to share is that we had a go to favourite spot to sit and watch the Prince Rupert harbour, he would talk for hours about his younger years being a tug boat driver, how he could tell you anything you wanted to know about a tug boat. He had big brains but one of his passions were fishing.  With that being said when I got the opportunity to head out myself I didnt hesitate, I left the next day. Image attachmentImage attachment

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Awesome I knew Larry and your mother.great read

Great storys and memories. 👍

fantastic ...

Today on #womeninfishingwednesday we are celebrating Char Alec of the Xaxli'p Nation.

" We fish on the Fraser River, near Lillooet BC. Our way of fishing is gillnet, dip net and set net fishing for Sockeye & Chinook Salmon. We first can the early sockeye, then our second batch we put away for freezing . After we get our canning and freezing done, we start our wind drying, after these are all complete we catch later runs for smoking. The Chinook that we catch are gifted to the elders of the community as they enjoy the feast. I have moved to this community 19 years ago, and wanted to learn. Because I am left handed my husbands family could not teach me how to cut fish because everyone is right handed, so I was taught how to use a gill net, that is my job. I will operate the ropes of the gill net and my husband will carry anything I catch to our family who is waiting at our fish camp and they will cut for hanging. My second job is to fin each fish to help my husband and father in-law before they fillet. We also help our neighbor camps who are around and need fish. When we go camping I also like to rod fish for trout or Sockeye Salmon. We use horses for travel as its a very long walk, and there is no motorized vehicles of any sort allowed in the traditional fishing stations, no trucks/cars, ATV, motorcycles, strictly by walking or using a horse. We own the rights to these fishing stations as Xaxli'p holds its own traditional fishing laws, that are abided by for all people and visitors who enter here. We are also taught only take what you need, don't get greedy, because that is what the elders have passed down." Thank you Char for sharing your story with us! ... See MoreSee Less

Today on  #womeninfishingwednesday we are celebrating Char Alec of the Xaxlip Nation. 

 We fish on the Fraser River, near Lillooet BC. Our way of fishing is gillnet, dip net and set net fishing for Sockeye & Chinook Salmon.  We first can the early sockeye, then our second batch we put away for freezing . After we get our canning and freezing done, we start our wind drying, after these are all complete we catch later runs for smoking. The Chinook that we catch are gifted to the elders of the community as they enjoy the feast. 

I have moved to this community 19 years ago, and wanted to learn.  Because I am left handed my husbands family could not teach me how to cut fish because everyone is right handed, so I was taught how to use a gill net, that is my job. I will operate the ropes of the gill net and my husband will carry anything I catch to our family who is waiting at our fish camp and they will cut for hanging. My second job is to fin each fish to help my husband and father in-law before they fillet.  We also help our neighbor camps who are around and need fish. When we go camping I also like to rod fish for trout or Sockeye Salmon. 

We use horses for travel as its a very long walk, and there is no motorized vehicles of any sort allowed in the traditional fishing stations, no trucks/cars, ATV, motorcycles, strictly by walking or using a horse. 

We own the rights to these fishing stations as Xaxlip holds its own traditional fishing laws, that are abided by for all people and visitors who enter here.  We are also taught only take what you need, dont get greedy, because that is what the elders have passed down. 

Thank you Char for sharing your story with us!Image attachmentImage attachment

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

Very good write up for my famous sister. Every fishing season I love seeing pictures u guys capture down 6 mile.

Wtg my Char Alec awesome, Thank you for sharing you story.

Woot woot way to go sister! Love this so much!

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