The Native Fishing Association (NFA)
Promotes and Supports Indigenous People
in BC's Commercial Fishing Industry.

Years of Results
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Fishers Assisted
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Licences Leased
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The Native Fishing Association (NFA)

Supporting Indigenous
BC Fishers

The Native Fishing Association (NFA) promotes and supports Indigenous commercial fishers in BC. Whether you have an established commercial fishing business or have just become interested in the industry, we are here to help.

We provide loans and grants, shared licenses and quotas, and a variety of support services to help you grow or start your fishing business.

Please browse our website to learn more about our programs and services, and get in touch if you have any questions.

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Today on #womeninfishingwednesday I would like to share the success story of Linda Thomas. ... See MoreSee Less

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Something special for #womeninfishingwednesday, we honored to share the story of Tenneisha McKay, a member of the Nisga'a Nation, and how fishing was a part of her healing journey.

" I was 23 when I went out on the boat for the first time as a young adult searching for something bigger than myself, I was able to feel more connected with the fact of "Change". When ever me and my father figure would hang out before he passed away July 08th 2020. He would always talk about his fishing adventures and show me many pictures before he died. Once he asked me if he got his aluminum boat set up to go with him, but I never had that chance unfortunately. The first turn around for my fishing adventure home I got to bring his wife 3 or 5 fresh black cod. I absolutely cherish his wife, and his oldest son too. They are awesome people and its sad that Larry Stava lost his life to the battle of cancer. There is so many fishing related memories, but this one sticks out the most. One day at dinner he asked if I could spend a few minutes to come share it with him. He made Salmon Steaks, I didn't know what I was in for until I showed up he had everything all nice and ready to eat. I sat down and laughed so hard that I said out loud I thought growing up I seen it all except leave it to him he made the Salmon steak waaaay bigger than my hand. He caught it on video and when we watched it we laughed so hard my eyes popped out of my head and he was like no seriously that plate is yours.One more memory Id like to share is that we had a go to favourite spot to sit and watch the Prince Rupert harbour, he would talk for hours about his younger years being a tug boat driver, how he could tell you anything you wanted to know about a tug boat. He had big brains but one of his passions were fishing. With that being said when I got the opportunity to head out myself I didn't hesitate, I left the next day. " ... See MoreSee Less

Something special for #womeninfishingwednesday, we honored to share the story of Tenneisha McKay, a member of the Nisgaa Nation, and how fishing was a part of her healing journey.

 I was 23 when I went out on the boat for the first time as a young adult searching for something bigger than myself, I was able to feel more connected with the fact of Change. When ever me and my father figure would hang out before he passed away July 08th 2020. He would always talk about his fishing adventures and show me many pictures before he died. Once he asked me if he got his aluminum boat set up to go with him, but I never had that chance unfortunately. 
The first turn around for my fishing adventure home I got to bring his wife 3 or 5 fresh black cod. I absolutely cherish his wife, and his oldest son too. They are awesome people and its sad that Larry Stava lost his life to the battle of cancer. There is so many fishing related memories, but this one sticks out the most. One day at dinner he asked if I could spend a few minutes to come share it with him. He made Salmon Steaks, I didnt know what I was in for until I showed up he had everything all nice and ready to eat. I sat down and laughed so hard that I said out loud I thought growing up I seen it all except leave it to him he made the Salmon steak waaaay bigger than my hand. He caught it on video and when we watched it we laughed so hard my eyes popped out of my head and he was like no seriously that plate is yours.
One more memory Id like to share is that we had a go to favourite spot to sit and watch the Prince Rupert harbour, he would talk for hours about his younger years being a tug boat driver, how he could tell you anything you wanted to know about a tug boat. He had big brains but one of his passions were fishing.  With that being said when I got the opportunity to head out myself I didnt hesitate, I left the next day. Image attachmentImage attachment

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Awesome I knew Larry and your mother.great read

Great storys and memories. 👍

fantastic ...

Today on #womeninfishingwednesday we are celebrating Char Alec of the Xaxli'p Nation.

" We fish on the Fraser River, near Lillooet BC. Our way of fishing is gillnet, dip net and set net fishing for Sockeye & Chinook Salmon. We first can the early sockeye, then our second batch we put away for freezing . After we get our canning and freezing done, we start our wind drying, after these are all complete we catch later runs for smoking. The Chinook that we catch are gifted to the elders of the community as they enjoy the feast. I have moved to this community 19 years ago, and wanted to learn. Because I am left handed my husbands family could not teach me how to cut fish because everyone is right handed, so I was taught how to use a gill net, that is my job. I will operate the ropes of the gill net and my husband will carry anything I catch to our family who is waiting at our fish camp and they will cut for hanging. My second job is to fin each fish to help my husband and father in-law before they fillet. We also help our neighbor camps who are around and need fish. When we go camping I also like to rod fish for trout or Sockeye Salmon. We use horses for travel as its a very long walk, and there is no motorized vehicles of any sort allowed in the traditional fishing stations, no trucks/cars, ATV, motorcycles, strictly by walking or using a horse. We own the rights to these fishing stations as Xaxli'p holds its own traditional fishing laws, that are abided by for all people and visitors who enter here. We are also taught only take what you need, don't get greedy, because that is what the elders have passed down." Thank you Char for sharing your story with us! ... See MoreSee Less

Today on  #womeninfishingwednesday we are celebrating Char Alec of the Xaxlip Nation. 

 We fish on the Fraser River, near Lillooet BC. Our way of fishing is gillnet, dip net and set net fishing for Sockeye & Chinook Salmon.  We first can the early sockeye, then our second batch we put away for freezing . After we get our canning and freezing done, we start our wind drying, after these are all complete we catch later runs for smoking. The Chinook that we catch are gifted to the elders of the community as they enjoy the feast. 

I have moved to this community 19 years ago, and wanted to learn.  Because I am left handed my husbands family could not teach me how to cut fish because everyone is right handed, so I was taught how to use a gill net, that is my job. I will operate the ropes of the gill net and my husband will carry anything I catch to our family who is waiting at our fish camp and they will cut for hanging. My second job is to fin each fish to help my husband and father in-law before they fillet.  We also help our neighbor camps who are around and need fish. When we go camping I also like to rod fish for trout or Sockeye Salmon. 

We use horses for travel as its a very long walk, and there is no motorized vehicles of any sort allowed in the traditional fishing stations, no trucks/cars, ATV, motorcycles, strictly by walking or using a horse. 

We own the rights to these fishing stations as Xaxlip holds its own traditional fishing laws, that are abided by for all people and visitors who enter here.  We are also taught only take what you need, dont get greedy, because that is what the elders have passed down. 

Thank you Char for sharing your story with us!Image attachmentImage attachment

8 CommentsComment on Facebook

Very good write up for my famous sister. Every fishing season I love seeing pictures u guys capture down 6 mile.

Wtg my Char Alec awesome, Thank you for sharing you story.

Woot woot way to go sister! Love this so much!

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Exciting News!

The 2nd Annual, BC Indigenous Seafood Supply conference has been announced! NFA will be hosting the conference at the Crest Hotel in Prince Rupert, January 16th and 17th 2025! Keep watching our Facebook page for more details! ... See MoreSee Less

Exciting News! 
The 2nd Annual, BC Indigenous Seafood Supply conference has been announced! 
NFA will be hosting the conference at the Crest Hotel in Prince Rupert,  January 16th and 17th 2025! 
Keep watching our Facebook page for more details!

3 CommentsComment on Facebook

Ken Malloway

Brent Campbell

Wishing continued safety for our Native fishers for the second half of the prawn season! Fun weather and fun tides lately! Lol! ... See MoreSee Less

Wishing continued safety for our Native fishers for the second half of the prawn season! Fun weather and fun tides lately! Lol!

#throwbackthursdayinfishing

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It's #womeninfishingwednesday!!

Today we are honored to share the story of Jackie Windsor from Bella Bella. "When i was younger I learned the fishing industry from my late father. As I grew he taught me to run the boat on my own incase anything were to happen to him on the water. We did charters to and from the neighbouring communities, as far as Campbell River, up to Kitamaat, into Rivers Inlet and Bella Coola. After many years of travelling with my father to and from places I got to know the lands, where to harvest not only from the sea but medicines from the lands also. I used to go out on saineboats with him for fishing, we went out on clam digging, SOK(spawn on kelp), food fishing for family and community members, hunting and medicine gathering. All before I started to go with friends and family after my late father moved from the community. I love camping with my family in the territories around our community and teaching the next generations on things I was taught about harvesting from the lands and sea. Our family is is mostly women, my grandmother had 3 boys and 4 girls and out of her children she had 12 granddaughters and 1 grandson, so we women over power the men in our family and had to learn harvesting at a young age together. This is an old photo of my niece on her first food harvesting experience. She picked a sack of seaweed. She was 3 years old in this photo and lives to come out harvesting every year to help make sure we have enough for the year as a family We go out on the waters in all kinds of weather, this is my cousin Tracy Reid and I. We harvest the kelp to set them back in the waters for herring eggs, also my cousins Tracy Reid and I. We set the Kelp for the herring to spawn on for a couple of days, maybe 4-7 days 10 at the most. This is a photo of my auntie Gloria Windsor-Brown, cousin Tracy Reid and I. After we harvest we salt the product to stop the eggs from turning into fish. This is Jennifer Squash and I, this is her first year out on SOK(spawn on kelp).I sometimes take other people out to Harvey their products also, or going to and from other communities. This is me taking my mother Bessie Paul out to harvest also. "Thank you Jackie for sharing your story with us. ... See MoreSee Less

Its #womeninfishingwednesday!! 

Today we are honored to share the story of Jackie Windsor from Bella Bella. 

When i was younger I learned the fishing industry from my late father. As I grew he taught me to run the boat on my own incase anything were to happen to him on the water. We did charters to and from the neighbouring communities, as far as Campbell River, up to Kitamaat, into Rivers Inlet and Bella Coola. After many years of travelling with my father to and from places I got to know the lands, where to harvest not only from the sea but medicines from the lands also. I used to go out on saineboats with him for fishing, we went out on clam digging, SOK(spawn on kelp), food fishing for family and community members, hunting and medicine gathering. All before I started to go with friends and family after my late father moved from the community. I love camping with my family in the territories around our community and teaching the next generations on things I was taught about harvesting from the lands and sea. Our family is is mostly women, my grandmother had 3 boys and 4 girls and out of her children she had 12 granddaughters and 1 grandson, so we women over power the men in our family and had to learn harvesting at a young age together. This is an old photo of my niece on her first food harvesting experience. She picked a sack of seaweed. She was 3 years old in this photo and lives to come out harvesting every year to help make sure we have enough for the year as a family We go out on the waters in all kinds of weather, this is my cousin Tracy Reid and I. We harvest the kelp to set them back in the waters for herring eggs, also my cousins Tracy Reid and I. We set the Kelp for the herring to spawn on for a couple of days, maybe 4-7 days 10 at the most. This is a photo of my auntie Gloria Windsor-Brown, cousin Tracy Reid and I. After we harvest we salt the product to stop the eggs from turning into fish. This is Jennifer Squash and I, this is her first year out on SOK(spawn on kelp).I sometimes take other people out to Harvey their products also, or going to and from other communities. This is me taking my mother Bessie Paul out to harvest also. 

Thank you Jackie for sharing your story with us.Image attachmentImage attachment+1Image attachment

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Waiglmga Sarah Xanuis

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